Light bulb logo: Sherwin

Coalition governments can play an important part in democracy

Written by Sherwin, published on June 4, 2010

We don’t elect a prime minister here in Canada. We vote in our own constituencies for a representative. Government is usually formed by the party with the most representatives. But sometimes, government is formed by a coalition of parties. No big deal. We elect a parliament, not a particular party. Parliament sorts it out. 1

And just because a minority government gets a non-confidence vote in the House, a whole new election doesn’t have to get triggered. When a government falls, it’s just not true that the only option is to have an election. But you hear this falsehood spoken often. You hear journalists say it. You hear newspaper editors say it. And you hear big business say it. And of course, lately the Conservatives have been saying it.

When a minority government falls, any other portion of parliament can come forward with the intent to form government. The majority of Canadians voted against Harper’s Christians last election. I would prefer a coalition.

  1. Our type of democracy is not the most democratic. Most advanced democracies use some form of proportional representation. But that’s another question for another day.
comments powered by Disqus