Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?

I tend to think that comms advice for scientists is also comms advice for everyone. Here’s an interest look at some social graphs and reach by scientists on Twitter

Communication has always been an integral part of the scientific endeavour. In Victorian times, for example, prominent scientists such as Thomas H. Huxley and Louis Agassiz delivered public lectures that were printed, often verbatim, in newspapers and magazines (Weigold 2001), and Charles Darwin wrote his seminal book “On the origin of species” for a popular, non-specialist audience (Desmond and Moore 1991). In modern times, the pace of science communication has become immensely faster, information is conveyed in smaller units, and the modes of delivery are far more numerous. These three trends have culminated in the use of social media by scientists to share their research in accessible and relevant ways to potential audiences beyond their peers. The emphasis on accessibility and relevance aligns with calls for scientists to abandon jargon and to frame and share their science, especially in a “post-truth” world that can emphasize emotion over factual information (Nisbet and Mooney 2007; Bubela et al. 2009; Wilcox 2012; Lubchenco 2017).

Science comms data visualization about scientists on Twitter

 

Science comms data visualization about scientists on Twitter

 

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